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Bloc Party

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Wednesday, 15 February 2012

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Bloc Party

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Saturday, 03 February 2007
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“I will charm, I will slice, I will dazzle, I will outshine them all” [The Prayer]

The bummer part about coming out with a first album which receives a good deal of hype is that your second album becomes a point of comparison. (Sorry, I’m going to do it here) If what you liked about Bloc Party on Silent Alarm is Kele's shouty exuberant vocals, dance party sound, or “drinking poison and eating glass” verve, then A Weekend in The City may not resonate strongly. The majority of the album is the more subdued, somber, or pensive Bloc Party. While there are tracks that come hard and heavy ("Song for Clay") and while there are thundering drums in even the songs with hushed vocals ("Sunday"), overall it lacks oomph. The music seems thoughtful and sincere in that they add curious elements to their songs; music box melodies on “SRXT” and tinkley bells ”Waiting for the 7.18,” humming tribal sound on “The Prayer,” the entirety of the album has threads of similarities which dilute the surprise. The tracks are pleasant and unobtrusive serving best as background, certain to be heard in commercials and apt for scenes in movies and television shows where someone is reminiscing about love or coming to terms with an excruciating decision. Broken into tracks, A Weekend In The City has elements to draw interest, but for an album “Is it so wrong to want rewarding? To want more than what is given to you?

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